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20 November 1849

It was decided to equip the Norwegian line infantry and light troops should be equipped with kammerlader rifles. The same day, the 18 bore (lødig) kammerlader Model 1849 was adopted. The guns were manufactured in Norway by the Kongsberg Arms... Read more ...

20 November 1849

The Kammerlader became general issue
It was decided to equip the Norwegian line infantry and light troops should be equipped with kammerlader rifles. The same day, the 18 bore (lødig) kammerlader Model 1849 was adopted. The guns were manufactured in Norway by the Kongsberg Arms Factory, by A. Francotte in Liege, Belgium and Crause in Herzberg in present-day Germany. Production in Norway started in 1850 after the production of Model 1846 was finished. Model 1846 and 1849 are fairly similar, and only minor details and markings distinguish them.

As a result, the Norwegian Army's armament was among the most modern in the mid-1800s. Only Prussia, who equipped their troops with von Dreyse's needle gun, was a few steps ahead. However, Norway was the first equipped the entire line infantry with breech-loading firearms.




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    Featured article

      Useful Reloading Equipment

    • Useful Reloading Equipment

      There is a lot of available reloading equipment for the black powder cartridge shooter. Much of it is for the especially interested shooters and most ordinary shooters can do without too much equipment. However, reloading equipment can be time-saving and may even enhance accuracy. This article presents some of the useful reloading equipment I use.

    Make your own drop tube stand

    Category: Miscellaneous
    Published: 7. September 2014 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Views: 3746


    The video shows the three different methods for compressing black powder, as well as how you can make a drop tube stand.

    A drop tube is used for compressing black powder loads.

    A drop tube is used for compressing black powder loads.

    The drawing shows how a stand can be made.

    The drawing shows how a stand can be made.

    The difference between a compressed (right) and not compressed load.

    The difference between a compressed (right) and not compressed charge.

    Alternatively you can make one of these stands.

    Alternatively you can make one of these stands.

    In order to load match-grade black powder cartridges it is important to compress the powder. This allows for more powder in the case, as well as improved combustion and accuracy. There are several methods for compressing black powder, but pouring the powder through a long drop tube is one of the simplest and best methods – especially if you mechanically compress it afterwards. This article shows how you can make a sturdy drop tube stand with simple tools.

    To make a drop tube stand you need a couple of wood boards and two eye screws, in addition to a saw, a hand drill and files. The eyes of the screw must be large enough to accept the drop tube.

    As seen from the drawing, one of the boards is made into a drop tube holder, while the other serves as a base. You can of course glue or otherwise fix the two parts together, but you save storage space by dismantling the stand after use. The two parts are fitted together through a rectangular opening in the bas the matches the drop tube holder.

    The drop tube holder is approximately 13in high. A bevel edge allows you to remove cases without bumping into the stand and also makes room for a loading block. Make the bottom end rectangular. This piece will later be fitted into the base. The height of the shape is identical to the height of the base.

    Screw the eye screws into the front of the drop tube holder; one at the top and one just before the bevel. To prevent the wood from cracking, pre-drill holes before mounting the screws.

    The base is simply a rectangular shaped piece of wood. Make sure it is perfectly level. Draw the outline of the drop tube holder's base. To make the rectangular opening, use a drill and mill out as much wood as you can before finishing the shape with a file.

    The drop tube stand is now practically done. Find a drop tube and insert it through the eye screws.

    To adjust the height of the tube, thread an O-ring on the tube and rest it against the uppermost eye screw. A rubber band or similar does the job as well.

    I use a loading tube from Pedersoli that I use for loading muzzle-loading rifles. Similar tubes can be made from copper, aluminum, brass or similar. To avoid powder spillage the tube should have a funnel at the top.

    Download illustrated instructions here. The measurements are not critical, but make sure the stand is stable.

    But does this method work? Yes, it does! Take a look at the picture to the right that shows two identical 70 grain loads of Swiss #4. The load to the left is weighed and poured directly from the weight into the vial, while the load to the left is weighed and dropped through and 28in (63.5 cm) drop tube. The difference is approximately 0.5mm/.020 in. The vial is .40in/10.16mm in diameter.