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25 April 1808

Slaget ved Trangen sto mellom norske og svenske styrker under krigen mellom 1808 og 1809. Den svenske oberst Gahn rykket over grensen 24. april 1808 med ca. 500 mann. Den 25. april ga Staffeldt kaptein Elias Nægler befaling om å besette... Read more ...

25 April 1808

Slaget ved Trangen
Slaget ved Trangen sto mellom norske og svenske styrker under krigen mellom 1808 og 1809. Den svenske oberst Gahn rykket over grensen 24. april 1808 med ca. 500 mann. Den 25. april ga Staffeldt kaptein Elias Nægler befaling om å besette forhugningene ved Trangen med to kompanier av Den throndhjemske grenaderbataljon, mens han selv med to andre kompanier av grenaderer og skarpskytterbataljonen under major Ræder, samt de elverumske skiløpere, marsjerte til Nya, på nordsiden av Flisa.

Mens Staffeldt ble værende på nordsiden ved Nya, gikk Ræder med tre kompanier trøndere og de elverumske skiløpere over Flisa og satte etter de svenske styrkene, som ble avskåret fra tilbaketog. Svenskenes baktropp ble kastet inn mot hovedstyrken, og det utspant seg et voldsomt sammenstøt i dalen mellom Kjelsås og Buttenås. Gahn forsøkte å bryte seg vei tilbake den vei han var kommet, og det lyktes svenskene ved gjentagne anfall å stanse nordmennene for en tid og trenge dem noe tilbake. Men snart ble de angrepet også fra den andre siden, da Næglers to kompanier rykket fram fra forhugningene i Trangen, hvor de hadde ligget og ventet på svenskene. Gahn måtte da danne front mot to sider.

Da Gahns soldater snart ikke hadde mer ammunisjon igjen, måtte han overgi seg. Etter slaget fant nordmennene 25 døde og 57 sårede svensker, mens de selv hadde 15 døde og 52 sårede. Kaptein Nikolai Peder Dreyer ble dødelig såret i slaget og døde fire dager senere. De døde ble begravet på Åsnes kirkegård. Fangenes antall var 445 mann, hvorav 11 offiserer. Av hele Gahns korps unslapp bare 115 mann, som samlet seg ved Klara i Värmland.




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    Featured article

      Reindeer hunter Jo Gjende and his rifles

    • Reindeer hunter Jo Gjende and his rifles

      Norwegian mountain man Jo Tjøstolsson Kleppe (1794–1884), also known as Jo Gjende, was a legendary reindeer hunter. A hermit for the better part of his life, he lived a lonely life in his cabin at Gjendeosen in Jotunheimen (The Home of the Giants) – a mountainous area in southern Norway. He spent his time hunting and reading books by the Age of Enlightenment\'s great philosophers, such as Voltaire and Volney. Known as a character and a crack rifle shot, Jo Gjende supposedly killed between 500 and 600 reindeer.

    Make Your Own Lead Shot

    Category: Shotgun
    Published: 24. November 2007 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Edited: 25. November 2007.
    Views: 70716

    Shotmaker Shotmaker

    Shotmaker and shot.

    The Norwegian prohibition against using lead shot is effective from 01.01.2005. However, the Norwegian Black Powder Union and Scandinavian Western Shooters have gotten an exemption from the ban due to the fact that these organisations are using shotguns that in many instances are old and cannot handle steel shot safely. The access to lead shot will most certainly decrease after January 2005 and the prices will rise. The solution for us black powder shooters can be to make our own lead or bismuth shot.

    Find out more!
    You can read more making shot, as well as loading black powder shotshells and muzzle-loading shotguns in the brand new book From Musket to Metallic Cartridge: A Practical History of Black Powder Firearms.

    The Shotmaker

    Traditionally lead shot have been made in high shot towers. The shotmakers melted the lead up in the tower and poured it through a sieve. The lead drops transformed into relatively round shot in the air because of the surface tension. On the ground they hit a container filled with water that cooled the shot and prevented it from deforming.

    From the USA many have known the machine called the “Shotmaker”. The machine goes by the immodest name “Littleton's Incredible Shotmaker” and is named after the inventor Jerry Littleton from Oroville, California. Littleton has now sold the business to Alan and Michael Burgess from Moses Lake, Washington. Their company is named Burgess Bullets. Burgess Bullets have improved the shotmaker quite a lot and the machine has become more user friendly. The Shotmaker comes in two versions: The Model 65 with 7 drippers and the Model 135 with 14 drippers.

    Shotmaker Shotmaker

    Shotmaker.

    The Shotmaker is constructed of powder-coated steel, both models feature cooling vents, high temperature connectors; Teflon insulated wires, and 15 amp safety fuses. Each model comes with seven drippers for each ladle, and additional size drippers are available for less than $50 per set of seven. The dippers are available in sizes from US #6 to #9. I recently bought a Model 65 shotmaker from Burgess Bullets. The price was $375. Production rate for the Model 65 is as much as 45 pounds per hour, and if you have the Model 135 it's possible to drip two different shot sizes at the same time, if desired.

    When you operate the Shotmaker you simply turn on the machine and put some bars of cleaned wheel weight lead in the ladle. Clean lead is important because lead with dirt in it can clog up the dippers. It also important to remember that pure lead is too soft to make quality shot.

    Shotmaker Shotmaker

    The Shotmaker in action.

    When the lead melts it drips though the dippers, then hit a small ramp and drops into your selected coolant fluid. I have used DOT 3 brake fluid as a coolant and that works perfect. If you use plain water as a coolant the shot will be out of round. You can also use a mix of water and water soluble oil, a mix of water and liquid soap or flame retardant hydraulic oil as a coolant. Afterwards the shot should be cleaned in soapy water to get rid of the coolant fluids. Not a big problem if you use liquid soap as a coolant though. Just rinse it with water a couple of times.

    The Shotmaker produces very uniform and round shot and it should be more than good enough for most shooters. If you tumble them in graphite powder you probably wouldn’t be able to see the difference if you compared them to factory lead shot. I and a couple of my friends have tried the shot and it works really great. Nice patterns in both front and backstuffers. Who needs a 120 foot high shot tower when you can have a Shotmaker?

    Visit the Burgess Bullets home page and learn more about the Shotmaker

    Note: The author of this article has no connection whatsoever to the makers of the Shotmaker, nor does he sell them.