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20 November 1849

It was decided to equip the Norwegian line infantry and light troops should be equipped with kammerlader rifles. The same day, the 18 bore (lødig) kammerlader Model 1849 was adopted. The guns were manufactured in Norway by the Kongsberg Arms... Read more ...

20 November 1849

The Kammerlader became general issue
It was decided to equip the Norwegian line infantry and light troops should be equipped with kammerlader rifles. The same day, the 18 bore (lødig) kammerlader Model 1849 was adopted. The guns were manufactured in Norway by the Kongsberg Arms Factory, by A. Francotte in Liege, Belgium and Crause in Herzberg in present-day Germany. Production in Norway started in 1850 after the production of Model 1846 was finished. Model 1846 and 1849 are fairly similar, and only minor details and markings distinguish them.

As a result, the Norwegian Army's armament was among the most modern in the mid-1800s. Only Prussia, who equipped their troops with von Dreyse's needle gun, was a few steps ahead. However, Norway was the first equipped the entire line infantry with breech-loading firearms.




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