Forum

Market


On this day

10 December 1898

The Treaty of Paris of 1898 was an agreement made in 1898 that involved Spain relinquishing nearly all of the remaining Spanish Empire, especially Cuba, and ceding Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines to the United States. The cession of the... Read more ...

10 December 1898

Treaty of Paris
The Treaty of Paris of 1898 was an agreement made in 1898 that involved Spain relinquishing nearly all of the remaining Spanish Empire, especially Cuba, and ceding Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines to the United States. The cession of the Philippines involved a payment of $20 million from the United States to Spain. The treaty was signed on this day in 1898, and ended the Spanish–American War. The Treaty of Paris came into effect on April 11, 1899, when the documents of ratification were exchanged.

The Treaty of Paris marked the end of the Spanish Empire (apart from some small holdings in North Africa). It marked the beginning of the age of the United States as a world power. Many supporters of the war opposed the treaty, and it became one of the major issues in the election of 1900 when it was opposed by Democrat William Jennings Bryan because he opposed imperialism. Republican President William McKinley upheld the treaty and was easily reelected.




Chat

Offline

No chatting right now.

    (You must be logged in to the Norwegian forum to chat.)


    Featured article

      Hunting with Black Powder Weapons

    • Hunting with Black Powder Weapons

      In this article you can read about hunting with black powder firearms, from a Norwegian perspective. The Norwegian game law limits the use of black powder for hunting, but a few hunters hunt small game with black powder rifles and shotguns. Read the article to find out more.

    Exploded View of a Flintlock

    Category: Miscellaneous
    Published: 15. November 2008 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Views: 19142

    The drawing below shows an exploded view of a Danish-Norwegian military flintlock. Note that he translation of this article is not quite finished.

    Find out more!
    You can read more about the development of the matchlock, wheellock, flintlock and percussion lock and their practical use in the brand new book From Musket to Metallic Cartridge: A Practical History of Black Powder Firearms.

    Flintlåsens deler

    Click the drawing for a larger version.

    1. Cock screw
    2. Cock spur
    3. Neck of the cock
    4. Body of the cock
    5. Tumbler screw
    6. Upper jaw
    7. Piece of leather
    8. Flint
    9. Lower jaw
    10. Face of frizzen (steel)
    11. Pan cover
    12. Tail of frizzen
    13. Pan cover screw
    14. Pressure arm
    15. Frizzen spring
    16. Frizzen spring screw
    17. Pan
    18. Lockplate
    19. Threaded hole for foremost lock plate screw
    20. Threaded hole for frizzen screw
    21. Bolster
    22. Pan screw
    23. Threaded hole for rearmost lock plate screw
    24. Anslagsflater
    25. Studdelskrue
    26. Studdel

    27. Stangfjærskrue
    28. Stangfjær
    29. Stang
    30. Stangskrue
    31. Nuss
    32. Nusskrapp
    33. Tumbler hook of mainspring
    34. Slagfjærskrue
    35. Lower limb of mainspring
    36. Slagfjærøre
    37. Upper limb of mainspring
    38. Cup of tumbler
    39. Stangarm
    40. Gjengehull for slagfjærskrue
    41. Gjengehull for fengpanneskrue
    42. Gjengehull for stangfjærskrue
    43. Gjengehull for stangskrue
    44. Forsterkningsknast for gjengehull
    45. Firkanttapp for hane
    46. Nusstapp
    47. Halvspennro
    48. Helspennro
    49. Springkile