Forum

Market


On this day

14 December 1718

Sweden called off the siege of Fredriksten in Norway after the death of their king Charles XII. In the Autumn of 1718 Charles had once more attacked Norway, intending to first capture Halden to be able to sustain a siege of Akershus. By first taking... Read more ...

14 December 1718

Sweden called off the siege of Fredriksten
Sweden called off the siege of Fredriksten in Norway after the death of their king Charles XII. In the Autumn of 1718 Charles had once more attacked Norway, intending to first capture Halden to be able to sustain a siege of Akershus. By first taking the border areas, Charles wished to avoid a repeat of the fiasco he had suffered two years before. The 1,400 strong garrison of Frederiksten fought ferociously to hold back the invasion, but suffered a severe setback when, on 8 December the forward fortification Fort Gyldenløve fell.

Encouraged by their very hard-fought success the Swedish army intensified their efforts against the main fort. The Swedish trenches had almost reached the main fortification walls when on the evening of 11 December (Swedish calendar: 30 November) 1718, a bullet struck and killed Charles XII while he inspected the work. The death of the king effectively ended the attack on Fredriksten and the invasion was called off on this day in 1718, leading to the conclusion of the war.




Chat

Offline

No chatting right now.

    (You must be logged in to the Norwegian forum to chat.)


    Featured article

      Different Firearms Ignition Systems

    • Different Firearms Ignition Systems

      The flint and percussion locks are the most commonly used ignition systems used in today\'s black powder firearms. Other systems, such as matchlock, snaphaunce and wheellock are also used, but in more limited quantities. This article gives you a brief overview of the different systems.

    Exploded View of a Flintlock

    Category: Miscellaneous
    Published: 15. November 2008 by Øyvind Flatnes.
    Views: 21099

    The drawing below shows an exploded view of a Danish-Norwegian military flintlock. Note that he translation of this article is not quite finished.

    Find out more!
    You can read more about the development of the matchlock, wheellock, flintlock and percussion lock and their practical use in the brand new book From Musket to Metallic Cartridge: A Practical History of Black Powder Firearms.

    Flintlåsens deler

    Click the drawing for a larger version.

    1. Cock screw
    2. Cock spur
    3. Neck of the cock
    4. Body of the cock
    5. Tumbler screw
    6. Upper jaw
    7. Piece of leather
    8. Flint
    9. Lower jaw
    10. Face of frizzen (steel)
    11. Pan cover
    12. Tail of frizzen
    13. Pan cover screw
    14. Pressure arm
    15. Frizzen spring
    16. Frizzen spring screw
    17. Pan
    18. Lockplate
    19. Threaded hole for foremost lock plate screw
    20. Threaded hole for frizzen screw
    21. Bolster
    22. Pan screw
    23. Threaded hole for rearmost lock plate screw
    24. Anslagsflater
    25. Studdelskrue
    26. Studdel

    27. Stangfjærskrue
    28. Stangfjær
    29. Stang
    30. Stangskrue
    31. Nuss
    32. Nusskrapp
    33. Tumbler hook of mainspring
    34. Slagfjærskrue
    35. Lower limb of mainspring
    36. Slagfjærøre
    37. Upper limb of mainspring
    38. Cup of tumbler
    39. Stangarm
    40. Gjengehull for slagfjærskrue
    41. Gjengehull for fengpanneskrue
    42. Gjengehull for stangfjærskrue
    43. Gjengehull for stangskrue
    44. Forsterkningsknast for gjengehull
    45. Firkanttapp for hane
    46. Nusstapp
    47. Halvspennro
    48. Helspennro
    49. Springkile